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and engage with iran then. too little maybe, too late, arguably not but not reciprocated. did didn't work. so then you could argue we have been too little threatening and too late. so it comes along in 2002. axis of evil mobilizing forces, we will do iran first and iraq and next. that is pretty threatening. strategy of regime change which is very threatening but not what you are supposed to do if you are trying to get people to stop building nuclear programs or believe in deterrence because the whole idea of deterrence is if you behave differently, you get to exist and we have a nice relationship but if your policy is no matter what you do i am getting rid of you that is an inducement to do stuff to keep you from getting rid of them but in any case there was threatening so the argument is we have been too little threatening and done it too late on would argue that was done. earlier. now you could argue the way the iraq war turned in 2004/2005 took the threat away because the iranians said the u.s. is losing. .. activities to actually make nuclear weapons is a distinct line. it has
. the immediate problem in the middle east is not nuclear security narrowly defined. the immediate problem is iran's nuclear program which threatens to destabilize and make a nuclear arms race. and the threshold of nuclear weapons. there is extensive and credible information for detailed studies and engineering work studying a nuclear warhead. it can already reach u.s. allies and bases in the middle east. the last administration and this administration, 3 round of international sanctions. the choice of two path, negotiation or isolation, iran's leaders ignored our choice, using negotiations and partial collaboration to divide the international community, stave off international sanctions and continue their nuclear pursuits. i can only assume iran's leaders calculate the influence and security that they see as provided by nuclear weapons or by reaching the threshold of having them outweigh whatever condemnation and sanctions emerge from the multilateral process. increasingly i would argue we must base our plans and diplomacy on the assumption that iran will have nuclear-weapons. did i mention i am
, and the gulf states. consultations on the security risks of iran's nuclear activities would be a first step. subsequent steps could include bilateral exercises, combined contingency planning, foreign military sales and missile and air defenses that can extend protection to regional partners and operate with their own defenses. third, the united states and nato should act to discourage further proliferation. they can reduce their incentives to proliferate. also iran must be denied any benefit from its nuclear arms. the world may have no choice but to live with a nuclear armed iran but we should not accept it or legitimate it. other would be proliferators should look at iran, even with nuclear weapons and see that treaty violations bring penalties instead of prestige and sanctions instead of security and isolation instead of influence. finally nato needs to consider the implications for its own policy. nato ministers will be meeting in estonia later this month. this item was added at the request of ministers from belgium, germany, luxembourg, netherlands and norway. these ministers have asked
believe. and egypt. i'm sorry, you're right. and she started talking to them not about iran, but also started talking about okay, how do we do with regional security. and secretary continue may remember early on when she went to the gulf. she said something about the importance of defenses. and a lot of commentators interpreted that as many were giving up on stopping iran from having nuclear weapons and she quickly clarified that no that's not the case. the challenge for the administration or any other administration is how do you shift from the diplomacy of prevention in the case of iran to the diplomacy to detainment in deterrence without suggesting, without losing your allies, without suggesting that you've given up on preventing iran from having nuclear weapons or without suggesting somehow it's acceptable. .. the credibility of the u.s. deterrent and on wednesday the president will sign in the start agreement which will extend the process of further reducing both in numbers of u.s. nuclear weapons and their means of delivery. there has been too much discussion about the coupling
for today as well as this next photograph of the accompanying saudi delegation. if and when iran becomes a especially in state, saudi arabia is likely to ask pakistan for some nuclear umbrella. the most frequently mentioned idea is that pakistani missiles tipped with nuclear warheads would be based in saudi arabia to deter iran from threatening the kingdom. such an arrangement would not break international agreements if the weapons remained under pakistani control. there are no hard facts to prove the existence of this notion of a pakistani nuclear umbrella. at least none available publicly. indeed, there are a range of denials but there is certainly a close diplomatic relationship between saudi arabia and pakistan. perhaps unusually close. wunl only has to -- one only has to watch the high-level visits to see the respective leadership's value. i don't have a photograph of another visit later in 1999. by the then minister of information, the united arab emirates. he was apparently given the same tour. i don't know whether a particular u.e. anxiousle was pointed out. this was the prefabri
the iran sanctions act of 1996 to enhance united states diplomatic efforts with respect to iran by expanding economic sanctions against iran. the speaker pro tempore: is there objection to the request from the gentleman from california? without objection, so ordered. the gentlelady from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. i have a motion to instruct conferees at the desk. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: ms. ros-lehtinen of florida moves that the managers on the part of the house at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two houses on the senate amendment to the bill h.r. 2194 be instructed, one, to insist on the provisions of 2194, a bill to amend the iran sanctions act of 1996, to enhance united states diplomatic efforts with respect to iran by expanding economic sanctions against iran, as passed by the house on december 15, 2009, and, two, to complete the work and present a conference report and joint explanatory statement by no later than may 28, 2010. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to clause 7 of rule 22, the ge
latest -- and sending his deputy and also iran showing off its latest development. is that going to cast a pall on the conference? does it focus people on the need to do something? but the main focus of the conference is going to be on matters -- >> the main focus of the conference is going to be matters not usually focused on at this level. what will come out of the conference is an accelerated plan to make sure that all of the, especially the medical nuclear materials around the world, which are small in quantity, but highly-enriched, are properly cared for. . you had a steady drumbeat these past few weeks. there was the nuclear posture review. what do you want to see them accomplish in the next couple of days? >> i think they have momentum on dealing with the rather technical issue of making sure that medical nuclear materials are well handled when they are no longer useful, that they are returned properly to where they can be reprocessed or disposed of. as to the bigger issue of stopping the iranian nuclear program for dealing with the north korean program, i think we're doomed to fa
against iran in an hour, michelle obama speaks to the the children at the white house. after that, a hearing on nasa's budget. when mrs. incluse former officers of both companies. that is live here on c-span at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> i think there is a huge black of knowledge about how this town works. >> aegis have to do the work yourself. >> this weekend, richard norton smith and douglas brinkley will talk about their work, their books, and their profession. >> all this month, see the winners of c-span's studentscam competition. they submitted the ideas on one of the country's greatest strengths or a challenge. what the top winning videos every morning on c-span at 60 a.m. eastern. but a 30 a.m. during the program, meet the students to make them. the house on thursday voted to send a bill imposing additional iran sanctions to negotiations with the senate. members debated the issue for a little more than in the dollar. ized. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you. mr. speaker, this motion comes at a critical time in our effort to prevent iran from dealing a devastating blow to the security
iran's leaders have ignored our choice and they taken a third path using negotiations and partial cooperation to divide the international community, to stave off international sanctions and to continue their nuclear suits. i can only assume that iran's leaders tokyu late at the prestige, influence and security that they see as provided by nuclear weapons or by reaching the threshold of having them outweigh whatever condemnation and sanctions emerge from the multilateral process. increasingly, i would argue, we must base our plans and diplomacy on the assumption that iran will have nuclear weapons. did i mention early-onset i was speaking for myself, not the u.s. government? okay, just want to make that clear. dears, wants nuclear arms and not be so suicidal as to launch nuclear attacks against israel, the united states or other partners are allies in the region. however iran's leaders may engage in nuclear brinksmanship, dangerous escalatory behavior to try to intimidate neighbors, to teach outside intervention or even to impress the republic. he may feel emboldened to use surroga
urgent threats. i think russia should be tougher on iran. i think iran has overplayed their cards. iran is treating russia like the tail was wagging the dog. that should not be permitted. i think russia should take a more tough position, sanctions against iran, for two reasons. this is because iran has crossed to many barriers, too many red lines and secondly because this is a prelude to war in the persian gulf. if it is not the united states, -- if it is not because of the united states, israel would not tolerate iran getting closer to nuclear capability. this is the argument i would use in russia and the united states, that the new treaty should be the basis for a much greater calculation on the fence and on iran. it can be like that. the fact of signing and ratification of the new treaty will already affect iranian policy. they are touchy on the question of russian-american policy. whenever we have contradictions, a rent toughens its position immediately. -- iran toughens its position immediately. >> terry taylor for the international council of life sciences pres s. given your view
, or would it be helpful at a time when you're still trying to persuade iran not to build nuclear weapons of the first office and you're trying to persuade the rest of the world to work with you to press iran. if you then announce, we will use our nuclear weapons against iran if iran does not stop trying to get nuclear weapons area i do not know how that would help the politics, but i do not know if u.s. nuclear workers would say we needed to defeat iran. they would said we do not, in which case, why would you talk about introducing the now, because i do not know they would be reassuring in the middle eastern conference. i do not know how that would play politically and be reassuring, fan may be others have a better idea. -- but may be others have a better idea. >> do you agree it is too late to prevent iran from getting nuclear weapons gunman -- nuclear weapons? what will happen to the status of america in the middle east if they have repeatedly said they will not allow iran to get nuclear weapons capability if they actually do get it? what happens then? >> i personally do not think econ
of the soul organizations talking about the situation of press freedom in iran day-by- day since january 1, 2010. we are updating our website with the latest news. you might have heard that with the new year coming, on march 21, some of the reporters were [unintelligible] you still have more than 100 of them in jail, reporters and blogers, a because,nd bl -- reporters and bloggers. it is not that. it is saying what is going on in the country. it is important. we will make sure that your friends in iran will get what you are saying tonight. we know that the message is getting there and we know that the message is getting out because our researchers are in contact with them. we still get the message out. that is why we're able to inform you of the numbers of prisoners there and the situation in the country. newspapers are being closed. journalists are being harassed every day. they're being jailed, they are being threatened, their families are threatened. it is hard to figure out what is going on. thanks to hasan, will have an overview of the situation. thank you very much. >> thank you very
sanctions against iran. it was approved by a vote for a three-11. here is a portion of that reported402-11. -- it was approved by a vote 403-11/ . >> the senate has agreed, recognizing the leadership and contributions. >> mr. speaker, i am in strong support of the motion to instruct. the world faces no security threat more than nuclear arms to tehran. -- iran. >> we must make certain that the prospects never comes to reality. it would intimidate and dominate the newspapers. it to be impervious to any type of correction. it would touch off a nuclear arms race. it would lead to catastrophe. iran might actually use the nuclear arms. the urgency of this issue is beyond. iran will be capable of developing a nuclear weapon in the next three-five years but. . . nuclear weapons capability is made more complicated by the fact that we all know that our best weapon for fighting this battle, economic sanctions, takes time to work. so we need the strongest possible sanctions and we need them fast. that's why i support this motion to instruct. the house bill, h.r. 2194, the iran refined petroleum sa
suggest additional sanctions against iran. president obama supports business leaders to support new financial regulations. after that, the senate budget committee continues to markup next year's budget proposal. tomorrow morning, live coverage of the hearing on the 2008 financial crisis and the role of credit rating agencies, particularly standard and poor's and moody's. witnesses include former officers of both companies. that is live at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> all this month, see the winners of c-span's studentcam documentary competition, middle and high school students from 45 states submitted videos on one of the country's greatest strengths for a challenge the country is facing. watch the top of videos every morning on c-span at 6:50 eastern just before "washington journal." meet the students that made them and for a preview for -- review of all the winners, visit studentcam.or.g g. >> we really have to get this right. if not, we could stifle innovation, the free-market, the economy and do more harm than good. >> as the senate moves closer to a vote, see the process unfold with
where press freedom is threatened. you might know it now but iran is at a very bad point at its history. reporters are fleeing the country. some of them are afraid that some friends or the families have been found by the government. they are deleting facebook from files. can you imagine being forced to delete your facebook profile because your friends are at stake? it is a critical moment right now. i am honored that hasan is there. in iran, he is a well-known photographer. he has done a lot of things for press freedom. reporters without borders is one of the soul organizations talking about the situation of press freedom in iran day-by- day since january 1, 2010. we are updating our website with the latest news. you might have heard that with the new year coming, on march 21, some of the reporters were [unintelligible] you still have more than 100 of them in jail, reporters and blogers, a because,nd bl -- reporters and bloggers. it is not that. it is saying what is going on in the country. it is important. we will make sure that your friends in iran will get what you are saying tonight
who are in iran. they are participating in the task force. they really believe that if these initiatives don't come from the u.s. government, that to have a dialogue that the only way that's really possible, given the current climate, is really to the internet as the panel exhaustively discussed this a few minutes ago. and they have also pointed out something that i think is really important that wasn't touched upon the first panel, which is not only is the internet important for this narrowly blind opposition movement, but it's important also information -- or communication technology inside the country is important also for this population that he mentioned that is not necessarily identified as part of the opposition, the vast public opinion in iran, the actually access to information is a state run media. and so one of the most glaring examples that has been given to me in terms of the cutoff of information inside the country was last summer when this young woman was killed on the street. some people in iran did not learn of this death until two or three week
, sending his deputy, and also iran showing off its latest technology and seeming to thumb its nose to this whole effort. i'm wondering if that's, in your mind, casts a pal on this conference or does it focus people on the need to do something. >> well, i think that the main focus of the conference is going to be on matters usually not handled on the head of state level, and that is good house keeping, which is very important when it comes to nuclear materials. but i think what will come out of the conference is a accelerated plan to make sure that all of the, especially the medical nuclear materials around the world, which are small in quantity but highly enrismed, are properly cared for. the second aspect of the summit is you just have all these major world leaders coming including the leader of china and that's a chance to discuss whatever issues come up. as to iran, i would expect that they would give us a loud die tribes and heavy doses of propaganda. >> what do you want to see from president obama from the obama administration in this summit? this is clearly a big opportunity
medvedev calling it a big lie. here's a portion of his remarks courtesy of iran's news channel. this is about 20 minutes. >> translator: nuclear energy is a very appropriate replacement for fossil fuels. but actually what happened in the nuclear energy field, the first people to acquire this energy, their main purpose was to actually use it for military purposes and dominate other nations. nuclear energy is a divine blessing. however, arrogant powers and selfish people, those who want to actually dominate all nations from square one from the very beginning, they actually had an inhumane approach towards this clean energy. they misused it. remember the first historical memory related to the nuclear energy, what was the first historical memory? that was the nuclear bombs that dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki. it was then when actually nucleus and knewically eye -- nucleii have a lot of power. from the very beginning they monopolized this energy and used it to dominate other nations. and by making wrong policies so up to this day they have not, they have prevented this energy to
networking, and grass-roots communications in iran. a group of former u.s. ambassadors discussed the prospects for peace in the middle east. >> all this month, see the winner of c-span's student documentary competition. watch the top winning videos every morning at 6:50 a.m. eastern before "washington journal." during the 830 a.m. program, meet the winner is. >> the white house announced ukraine will get rid of its nuclear material by 2012. robert gibbs spoke with reporters about the ukraine agreement and other nuclear issues. he is joined by counter- terrorism advisor john brennan. here is a portion of that meeting. >> good afternoon. before we hear from john brennan, i want to start with that announcement. ukraine announced a landmark decision to get rid of all of its stockpile of highly enriched uranium by the time of the next nuclear security summit in 2012. ukraine intends to remove a part of its stocks this year. it will convert its civil nuclear research facilities to operate with low enriched uranium fuel. this is something that the u.s. has tried to make happen for more
nuclear technology to china, iran, libya and north korea. the extent to which he did this as a so-called rogue agent is disputed. he claims he did it under the instruction of successive military and political regimes. there are also allegations that he offered nuclear technology to iraq, egypt and syria. the man to comically be left we can only see his legs was pakistan's chief of army staff, general pervez musharraf heard later that year he overthrew nawak sharif in a military coup in sharif was later exiled in saudi arabia. also there that day with the head of the pakistan air force, the head of the pakistan navy and the top bureaucrats, retired general at the pakistani ministry of defense. reportedly, grants all time, his son print colored print zoltan and to delegation was around the enrichment plant saw that gary missiles were on the same site and also shown some nuclear weapons. you will recall that in the previous year, 1998, pakistan has successfully testified to gtri missile and the sub nodong. apparently the administration of kahuta with that day. on jokingly to print zo
was a well-known journalist in iran -- he is still in prison. they accused him of activities against islam. he criticized the supreme leader. he cannot write anymore for the future. they sentenced him to exile for five years from iran. in iran. other journalists are in prison, one is in prison for more than 10 months. he is in " the hunger strike now in the prison, during the persian new year. many of the journalists will, even photographers, we do not know exactly what is their situation. how they're living in the prison. no access to getting freedom. you do not know how they are doing in the court. you cannot see the court and you cannot speak just for defending them. many -- the journalists, i can tell you. the most important thing is, any journalist who is criticizing the government, who they are not [unintelligible] with the rules, they are [unintelligible] this is the fortunate time. when you are in the official prison, it is ok. your family knows who you are and they can be with you weekly, maybe once in a month. some people are in secrecy. they are in a secret places. the revolutio
and constructive leadership of russia. my question is about iran. i wonder if you could describe for us how you view russia's nuclear program. is it a threat to russian national security interests? are you concerned it triggering a nuclear arms race in the middle east and now that you and president obama are on the same page when it comes to sanctions, are you on the same page with him when he says that force should be an option that's kept on the table? [russian translator for president medvedev] >> the talks about iran with mr. obama and my other colleagues are a part of our agenda. we do that regularly and on a full basis. this means that iran is a problem. and what is important that we find evidence of what their nuclear program is, as any society. they do have the right to develop the civilian nuclear program. but the problem is how they convince us of the community that it is and lately we did not bring any improvement to the situation. it has aggravated. and iran ignores the questions addressed they keep saying small praise it and make small suggestions. we are talking about the future.
on "special report," alarming word that iran may be able to hit u.s. with missile by middle of the decade. white house uses a carrot and stick approach of financial reform. and the supreme court says constitution protects images of cruelty. live from the studio in washington, this is "fox report." good evening, i'm bret baier. the potential threat that a nuclear iran could pose is hitting home tonight. white house correspondent mike emanuel reports from the pentagon. there is new information that iran could have the ability to attack the u.s. within a few years. >> reporter: iran continues developing the ballistic missile technology and could hit the united states in five years, according to a pentagon annual report to congress. the unclassified version on the military power of iran says, "with sufficient foreign assistance, iran could probably develop and test an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching the united states by 2015." but with the u.s. saying it will not have a missile defense system capable of protecting europe until 2018, one expert says the obama administrat
signed on to the bush version was not so much defense against iran if but to try to establish a black role -- a black robe -- a bilateral link to the u.s.. to summarize or to conclude, the european states bordering russia are concerned about russia's ambitions in countries like ukraine, moldova and georgia and the possibility of another war in georgia is not to be discounted. exert even on their own security, particularly with the most vulnerable baltic states, as proof of their article 5 defense guarantees, they have pushed the alliance phosphatase for the three baltic states from the fact for chief of -- baltic states. nato did not respond. even to position some nato infrastructure on their territories, this is why the deployment of a battery of patriot missiles with a small american contingent in northern poland is considered extremely important because it ties nato closer to the defense of these countries. they also want greater clarity as to how all nato countries interpret article 5 which is subject to some debate. and proof that the alliance is an effective deterrent policy. if
and the palestinians, once and for all. it is an example of how the influence of iran has grown over the last 20 years in the region. they're growing strength makes it harder to reach a deal with the palestinians. over time, this will become even more difficult. israel would be wise to try to strike a deal with the coming palestinian leadership. they will not be around forever or much longer. i do not think they will find a better leadership than what they have right now. if those leaders on the palestinian side fail, in the future, the west bank could look like south lebanon on or gaza, which is not in the interest of israel. here is what i would buy as the president is to choose your moment carefully -- advise the president' is to choose your moment carefully. we need to put a concrete plan on the table. once you jump into this, the stakes are very high both for the region and the united states. the united states and the administration need to be prepared for what may come and may need to stick to a very difficult time as we engage on this issue. i will stop there. thank you very much. >> thank you
there was no sanctions on iran because the russians have supported three rounds of sanctions against iran in the u.n. lastly i think the administration would like to and extra strategic sense particularly in the reset with the russians is try to regain some leverage in the u.s./russia/china relationship. and i think it is worth -- i'll leave you with this thought in my opening remarks. while i think it's appropriate to have modest expectations about -- about the reset with the russians, when i look at the three key security issues driving the relationship, iran, afghanistan, and nuclear security, i would conclude that probably moscow's position on all three of those sets of issues are closer to us than are beijing. and maybe that's something to think about. thanks. >> with that i would like to introduce my colleague, sharon squassoni. sharon is the fellow for our proliferation council and this is her first briefing at csis. >> thanks, andrew. i guess i'm the functional specialist here. i'm going to talk a little bit about the nuclear security summit that will take place in washington next monday.
they are going to be with the sanctions on iran, i did not think anybody in the obama administration is under the illusion that would avert sanctions are leveled on the iranians are going to solve the problems. we're going to have to wait and see. >> could you follow up just a bit? what are we likely to see? will there be developments in the coming week on sanctions in iran and how would that become evident? >> in a lot of ways, we are in the same place we have always been on sanctions with iran. over the past few years, we have tried to target sanctions so that they did not effect the iranian people as a whole all the while knowing that the kinds of things which would relate get their attention are the kinds of things that hurt -- restrictions on refined petroleum products into iran. they heard the iranian people and iran's trading partners. it is easy for the u.s. to talk about sanctions. we cannot have a big trading relationship with them. it is a lot harder with russia and china, particularly china. the effort right now, since iran has really refused to comply with u.n. security council r
that the threats or the potential threat from iran and protecting the security of europe and the united states, that remains our focus on missile defense. when we announced that, the russians held that. so our stance on missile defense has not changed despite the fact that they are now looking at it through a different lens. i believe he is also talking about missile defense capability that is offensive in nature that does not exist. >> will that be in prague? >> if president medvedev, if they discussed missile defense, the president will simply reiterate what he and others have told anybody in the world that our posture on missile defense is to ensure the security of this country, our allies in europe from the growing threat and a possible threat from iran. >> does the schedule have any it obama-medvedev capability in it? >> there is some confusion on the press schedule that went out. the signing of the statements and the q&a are all blocked off. our apologies if that confused you. >> [unintelligible] >> have each. [laughter] -- half each. [laughter] whoever is called on gets just four questi
. they will for me to the crowd saying this is the man who is responsible for all of the bloodshed. >> iran announces they are stepping up their nuclear program. they have faster nuclear centrifuges. welcome to bbc world news. coming up for you. nazi flags for a funeral in south africa. pope benedict has signaled he is prepared to meet more victims of central -- sexual abuse by catholic priests and the church will investigate such cases. there has been emergence of files in california that suggested that as far back as 1985, the future pope decided not to defrock 8 priest. the vatican has confronted the signature of the cardinal in the letter in question. this might reignite a something that the church rather hoped was dying down. >> it could very well become a problem. this goes back to the 1970's when the priest did three years probation for molesting two young boys. when the probation was over, that is when the diocese in california started a dialogue with the vatican. the case was put on the shelf for a couple of years and it was not until 1985 that the letter was revealed. this is what is provin
the nuclear arsenal by 1/3. >> looming over all this is iran and it's own fluke clear ambitions. >> a coalition of nations insisting that the islamic republic of iran face consequences because they have continually failed to meet their obligations. >> reporter: but before a single nuclear weapon is destroyed, the treaty must be ratified by the u.s. senate, a prospect the white house appears to be what nervous about. >> by the serious potential bump in the road here, politico reporting tonight that israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has bowed out of the 46 nation summit next week reportedly a criticism of israel's nail your to sign the ---the treaty. >>> the cigarette smoking diplomat who has sparked a terrorism scare last night on a united airlines flight from d.c. to denver. well, today, we learned that moouchld al-madadi who was arrested but not charged was actually on his way to visit an imprisoned terrorist. >> a man who's serving a term in prison for fail. >> al-madadi sparked a terrorism scare. officials say he lit a rig set in the flight lavatory, when asked what h
, facing the realities which is more than a little bit broad. i think we're going to try to discuss iran as much as possible, but we will entertain questions from elsewhere. before we start, there are a couple of announcements that i'm supposed to make, cell phones off, please. there will be signings following the session, the signing for this panel is located in the north signing area that'll be marked haines 39. .. followed by violence in the streets. the roots of the agreement reformist movement turned into something larger and political. all of this is superimposed upon the ongoing debate about iran's nuclear program and whether there are a temps to weapon negative the program, and if so, what the rest of the world can and should do about it. the los angeles times we are proud of our coverage there. our correspondent has spent an awful lot of time in tehran. he did a tremendous work last year and was recommended by the pulitzer prize committee is a fine reporting. one of the secrets of the success is he was able to kind of get beyond the black and white narrative that often defines,
're heading to capitol hill where lawmakers are discussing iran's nuclear envisions and threat to the u.s. >>> the quintessential teen accessory. a new study finds young people can't live without their cell phones and wait just how much they're attached to those gadgets. >> got to get out and smell the roses once in a while because we've had a beautiful day but showers are already starting to sneak into southwestern virginia. nothing to worry about tonight. nice and dry but i'll let you know when the showers will roll into town and things are looking. fox 5 news at 6:00 will be right back. - ( music playing ) - we know technology can make you more connected. but now it can make you more connected to your doctor through e-mail. test results from home. check records. change appointments. now doctors, nurses, techs, pharmacists are all digitally connected to each other. and ultimately connected to you. at kaiser permanente, we believe that if knowledge is power, shared knowledge is even more powerful. kaiser permanente. thrive. >>> israel celebrating its independence day. 62ped anniversary
the crescent like design of the logo is not a coincidence especially at an event where iran's nuclear ambition and al qaeda's search for a bomb are prime topics. of course, liberals might tell you the logo is just a stylized version of a hydrogen atom. sure it is, but when you take a really close look, obama's crescent nuke terrorist icon looks like this and this and even this. coincidence? wake up, america. >> the pigly wiggly, i new it. "countdown with keith olbermann" starts right now. have a great night. >>> which of these stories will you be talking about tomorrow? smoking gun, as the tea party express in boston draws only 5,000, the idea that it is independent grassroots, destroyed. politico finds a 2009 memo, republican consultants dreamt it up and planned it as a way to raise money for their pac and planned how to promote it on fox news. independents who aren't, news that is propaganda. >> tea party express, we applaud you for uniting and for putting up with the bs from the lame stream media. >> but the memo shows, madam, it's all a congame. >>> the oklahoma politicians bid to create a
" and coverage of the u.s. house. they're considering sanctions against iran. here is what we are covering on c-span 3 today. at 10:00 a.m. eastern time, a senate hearing looks at the proposed budget for nasa the head of the space agency will testify. at 3:00 p.m. eastern time, the den britain's party leaders. this one will cover the topic of foreign policy. this year's poll in terror -- parliamentary election season is the first to cover u.s.-style televised debate. you could watch this on cspan 3. >> we still have a best work force out there with too many people cannot read, can learn, can compete, and 80% of the people will be in the workforce "we have to do more with them. >> whether it is bill clinton or last week, the cspan video library features of 115,000 unique individuals and every day eds new faces that you can follow. circuit, which it, placket, every program since 1987 available free on line at the cspan video library. >> now national security adviser james jones. he spoke of the 25th anniversary for the washington institute for near east policy. topics covered in the speech includ
and the militia of the several states. uh-oh. our guest, john dean. >> that old beach boy song, bomb iran, you know, bomb, bomb, bomb. >> then it was just funny. now on iran, he's just the ayatollah mccain. >> we keep pointing the gun, we haven't pulled a single trigger yet and it's about time we did. >>> worsts, bill-o says he's proved nobody on fixed news ever said you'd go to jail if you don't buy insurance, except the fox guy who said it on bill-o's show. and the men who made talking during cheesy movies into high art. >> you know the penalty for acting without instructions. >> i think everyone in this movie is acting without instructions. >> our special guests, joel hodgson, trace bill you, and their new live show cinematic "titanic." time for go to bed. push the button, frank. all the news and commentary now on "countdown." >> what do you see, cat scan man? >>> good evening from new york. we begin tonight in unprecedented fashion. liberals, progressives, democrats. our top story tonight is not really for you, though you are encouraged to rubber neck at the train wreck. tonight, our fifth
to get support for new sanctions against iran. after promising not to, florida's governor makes a declaration of independence. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. crews off the coast of louisiana are scrambling tonight to contain an oil spill, which is apparently much worse than first thought. we have fox team coverage. senior white house correspondent major garrett reports on how the spill could effect u.s. energy policy but we begin with correspondent kris gutierrez live in venice, louisiana, with what is happening in the gulf of mexico now. good evening. >> reporter: good evening to you, bret. the coast guard just announced what it called a novel approach to stemming this oil flow. if approved, officials plan to dump chemical disbursement on top of the leaking well head some 5,000 feet below the surface. now the chemical could potentially break up that oil before it reaches the top of the water. one coast guard official said this may be the first time this has ever been allowed in u.s. history. the size and the scope of
. first, iran could develop and test a missile capable of reaching the united states? five years. that's the assessment from the courtesy of the pentagon which released a new report on iran's military. a classified version was given to congress. we don't know the difference except it paints a dangerous picture. according to this report, fox news cannot independently confirm this. if iran gets help from another country, it could have an intercolony blais tick missile in 2015 large enough to care a nuclear warhead. for reference, new york city is 6,000 miles. iran doesn't have a nuclear weapon or the no how to put one on a missile. mike emanuel is live at the pentagon. you know, you're shields go up because we got burned the last time we are heard this. talk about this missile concern and how much information they're giving us. >> well, essentially we don't know what's in the classified version. that part about able to strike the united states by 2015 is on page 11. they buried the lead, the thing that concerns the americans. they're working on nuclear development at the same time they w
the next two years. we have team fox coverage. jonathan hunt on the reaction from iran and north korea which were not invited to the summit. first, major garrett live at the summit in washington. let's begin with that ukraine deal. why is that important? >> first of all it's important because the united states has been trying to reach an agreement with ooh ukraine more than 10 years, at least 86 kilograms of uranium the ukraine will turn over for destruction or reprocessing into low level fuel to be used for civilian nuclear reactor. where will it go? that was a question raised. one destination could be the united states and gibbs satisfies take likely. then he was asked, wait a minute, when the ukrainian president, who president obama met with today, was asked about this, he said that highly enriched uranium will go to russia. when robert gibbs was reminded of this, he said this was a russian deal in origin and that's a more likely destination. one of two places the enriched uranium will go, russia or the united states. in either case the white house believes it's safer in russia or t
, erdogan, to ask him about sanctions in iran and concerns that he's becoming less committed to the united states and more interested in muslim neighbors. i also talked to nigeria's acting president, who gave us his first interview since taking office. we asked him about the christmas day bombing plot and whether nuclear terrorism is his top priority. and we'll also be speaking to former united nations secretary-general kofi annan this hour about good governance in africa and whether the u.s. should be involved with the indicted president of sudan. >>> but first, turkey and a look at prime minister erdogan's record. cnn ice ivan watson has that. >> reporter: erdogan first swept to power in 2002. his campaign promise then, get turkey into the european union. he introduced democratic reforms and succeeded in launching eu membership negotiations in 2005. but erdogan's government has also repeatedly clashed with the powerful turkish military and this overwhelmingly muslim country's traditional secular establishment. >> he will be a person who wanted to turn a secular democratic republic into a
neighbors, iraq, syria and iran. after decades of relative isolation, erdogan's government is reaching out to the middle east. this dramatic foreign policy shift has generated some concern among turkey's traditional western allies. but some would argue these middle eastern overtures are only natural for a country that straddles both europe and asia. ivan watson, cnn, istanbul. >> i talked about that with the prime minister as well as his controversial stance on iran and israel. mr. prime minister, thank you very much for joining us. >> translator: thank you. sb >> what do you hope to achieve here at the nuclear security summit? >> translator: i have responded to this invitation with great hope. our wish and desire is to make sure that this step that is being taken for the prevention of the proliferation of nuclear arms will provide a positive response to the expectations of the people. >> as you know, there are many, many heads of state, heads of government here. iran has not been invited. and the world is very concerned about iran's nuclear program. president obama and allies are talking
cannot talk directly against islam in iraq. one of the professors in iran, he's also a journalist. they're following their people from -- actually, we cannot do the same 1,400 years when the people at that time did for the prophet mohammed. and even we cannot do for this, as i told you one of the examples, who said, cannot access, you cannot just cooperate with the foreign media. i was with the foreign media for 10 years. my daughter said how do you know the american news agency and the older people criticize the united states. other journalists in the same situation. in iran, it's difficult to say, you can say, you know, free any of your idea. it's really difficult. i hope i answer your question. i want to add something about your question. two things. the first is that two weeks ago, the revolutionary guard arrested 13 netizens, 13 people using the internet to get information out. what is difficult as we do not have their names. the authorities do not want to give the names. it is difficult to know who was in prison. liviu spent two hours and you are released. it is difficult to get t
on the biggest threat. when will they get serious about iran? new governor takes on teachers' union. in the battle to save the failed state of new jersey. can he win? what other states can learn what other states can learn from his strategy. captioned by closed captioning services, inc. >>> if you look at it carefully, it will lead to endless taxpayer bailouts of wall street banks. >> we will not support a bill that creates that risk. the central test of credibility to make sure we can stand up and say that when large companies manage themselves to the point where they cannot survive out the government we put them out of existence. >> paul: welcome to the journal editorial report i'm paul gigot. fresh off health care, a new battle waged.ç democrats hope it is their next big win. financial reform legislation. you just heard senate minority leader are mcconnell argue the democrats' plan to overhaul the financial industry would encourage future taxpayer bailouts. a claim the administration rejects who is right and who has the upper hand? joining the panel this week dan henninger. mar
is the problem and that is iran and iran's nuclear weapons and none of what president obama's policies are going to do are going to close the backdoor. in the end, no, i don't think we are made safer at all. much more dangerous in fact. >> mike: when two countries had nuclear devices it was easy to look at each other and say let's have containment. now, we have pakistan, probably iran, on the way, i hope not. >> north korea. probably israel, they haven't admitted it but we make the assumption that they may have. and we don't know who is walking around with the shoulder fired version of one that has been able to pirate it from some nation. it is a different world. >> and a harder world. in the cold war, the russians and americans we knew if they attacked us we could attack them back and do just as much damage and therefore nobody started a war. and our policy toward other countries was you pick a fight with us i reserve the right to crush you. >> mike: like you use a knife we use a gun. you send us to the hospital and we send you to the morgue. the difference here if president obama and rightly i
but were inside an administration dealing with iran and all of these challenges. all of this in the newspapers about robert gates, what does it mean? these contingency plans for iran. break it down. >> i think what's going on here is that the administration is beginning to face the choice that's always been there which is how do you deal with a country that is probably not going to be affected by economic sanctions? do you pursue a containment course which means essentially improving your military relationship with saudi arabia, the gulf states, egypt and israel so that you can deal with a nuclear iran without losing your security? or do you begin to develop military options for attacking iran. >> robert kagan, do you agree with that? is the administration positioning itself in the right way? >> i actually think that the administration is actually trying to help its own diplomatic efforts. i think there is an understanding which was lost at a certain point in this administration that in order to have a successful diplomatic strategy, you need to have the threat of mil
, steve centanni, from washington. this is a fox news alert, big breaking news today on iran. it's hard to tell which way it's breaking. there is new pressure to stop iran's nuke program after the s r cia -- cia admitted these guys can probably build a bomb. china is saying something different, and iran is, too, and what about israel? how do they factor in? we're going to show you what they're doing when ambassador john bolton joins us in just three minutes. tea party protesters aren't the only ones who think washington is not listening. polls suggest 75% of the country now thinks their views are not being represented, but we saved the really interesting numbers for our debate coming up in about ten minutes. ♪ >> california, i'm with the 49th military police brigade, and today i want to say happy easter to my son anthony and my daughter, charlie. i love you very much, and i can't wait to see you again soon. [ female announcer ] breathe right asks... [ woman ] could i ask you to strip on the street? absolutely! i have a lot of stuffiness at night. it wakes me up. i have allergies. ♪
," president obama makes headway with china on iran. we'll have a report on the nuclear summit, and brit hume's analysis and expectations. pols mourn the death of their president and many other leaders. we look at what happens next there. our new series, "it's all your money" begins with a look at the possibility of new taxes. and you helped pay to educate a man accused of schooling terrorists. all that, plus the all-star panel right here, right now. >> bret: welcome to washington. i'm bret baier. president obama says the prospect of terrorists obtaining nuclear weapons is the single biggest threat to u.s. security. lead eers and top officials of 47 countries are in washington today and tuesday to try to come to some agreement on how to keep that from happening. senior white house correspondent major garrett reports there is the possibility of progress on the west's most serious problem. >> reporter: with the largest gathering of nations to discuss nuclear threat, they want commitment from president hu jintao to support new sanctions against iran. last week, mr. obama secured russia's backing
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